Thomas Nelson Community College Presents Black History Month Calendar of Events


Published: January 28, 2010

Thomas Nelson Community College will observe Black History Month with a series of presentations, lectures and other activities that reflect the many contributions of African Americans. The month-long celebration begins Tuesday, February 2 and culminates February 26.

For more information regarding Thomas Nelson Community College’s Black History Month event series, contact Ms. Sandra Robertson at 825-3678.

Freed Slave Reverend Gowan Pamphlet Visits Thomas Nelson Community College
Mr. James Ingram, Living History Interpreter

February 2
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Room 110
Historic Triangle Campus-Williamsburg
Video Streamed to Room 158, Diggs Hall, Hampton Campus

Noted Colonial Williamsburg costumed interpreter Mr. James Ingram will present in character his historically accurate, interactive interpretation of Reverend Gowan Pamphlet. A freed African slave, Reverend Pamphlet was a visionary leader and founder of one of the earliest African American congregations. Ingram’s portrayal of the “enigmatic” Reverend Gowan Pamphlet is sought after by organizations and educational institutions. He uses biblical texts and historical events from the colonial period to help guests identify with enslaved Virginians and their struggle to become both free and equal.

Spoken Word: “Words of Wisdom and Reflections of History” Open Mic

February 4
2:00-3:00 p.m.
Griffin Hall, Gators Cafeteria
Hampton Campus

The Spoken Word is a style of performance poetry that began in New York City and became popular among African Americans in the early nineties. Sponsored by Thomas Nelson’s African American History and Culture Club, this event offers participants the opportunity to perform poetry during an open mic experience.

“How Far the Promise Land?”
The Reverend Dr. Richard W. Wills, Sr.

February 4
7:00– 9:00 p.m.
Templin Hall, Dr. Mary T. Christian Auditorium
Hampton Campus

From the dawn of our American democracy, Presidents and preachers alike have employed Promised Land language to convey and communicate their sense of American identity and destiny. Not unlike them, the enslaved of our nation appropriated that hope for freedom and full emancipation. In observation of Black History Month, “How Far the Promised Land?” considers that very powerful narrative from a collective perspective and raises the question as to where we are in our mutual journey toward that more perfect union.

Pastor Dr. Richard W. Wills, Sr., First Baptist Church, Hampton, Virginia considers that very powerful narrative, “How Far the Promised Land,” from a collective perspective and raises the question as to where we are in out mutual journey toward that more perfect union.

“Harriet Tubman: The Chosen One”
Featuring Gwendolyn Briley-Strand

Tuesday, February 9
12:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Templin Hall, Dr. Mary T. Christian Auditorium
Hampton Campus

The Chosen One, written and performed by Gwendolyn Briley-Strand, celebrates the life and contributions of the great African American leader Harriet Tubman. With over 20 years of experience performing on stage, television and movies, Briley-Strand transforms herself into a multitude of characters as she recreates the story of Harriet Tubman’s early years. Follow her footsteps from her life as an enslaved person to her escape and her experiences as a conductor on the Underground Railroad.

“From Thomas Nelson Community College to Success in the Corporate World”
Mr. Kenneth and Mrs. Thomasina Wright

Thursday, February 11
6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Templin Hall, Dr. Mary T. Christian Auditorium
Hampton Campus

TNCC alumni Kenneth Wright, President and CEO of Wright’s Engineering & Design of Portsmouth, Virginia and Thomasina Wright, Director, Subcontract Management, Northrop Grumman, Newport News, Virginia will share their experiences as alums that succeeded against the odds. Their compelling stories will be beneficial to anyone, especially students, striving for success.

“Black History Month Movie Night” –  The Great Debaters

February 17
5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Moore Hall, Espada Conference Room
Hampton Campus

A 2007 drama directed by Denzel Washington and based on the true story of Melvin B. Tolson, a professor at Wiley College Texas. In 1935, he inspired students to form the school’s first debate team, which went on to challenge Harvard in the national championship. Rated PG-13

Admission is free and refreshments will be served.

Free and open to the public, the presentation will examine Black History Month’s beginnings, and its relevance and significance in today’s more diverse American society.  Dr. Schexnider will address some continuing challenges our nation faces related to race and globalization, and explore ways that higher education can play a meaningful role.

“Why Black History?”
Alvin J. Schexnider, president TNCC

February 18
2:00-4:00 p.m.
Dr. Mary T. Christian Auditorium
Templin Hall, Hampton Campus

Free and open to the public, the presentation will examine Black History Month’s beginnings, and its relevance, and significance in today’s more diverse American society. Dr. Schexnider will address some continuing challenges our nation faces related to race and globalization, and explore ways that higher education can play a meaningful role.

Black Expressions – “Sounds of Music”: A Piece of the Present and a Pinch of the Past
Kevin “The Moose” Anderson, Program Director, WHOV-88.1 FM,
Hampton University

February 24
12:00 –2:00 p.m.
Griffin Hall, Gators Cafeteria
Hampton Campus

“Who Sampled This?” is a Black History music trivia game that provides students an opportunity to identify the original music that has been sampled to create most of today’s popular music. Kevin “The Moose” Anderson will guide students through hip hop’s connections to jazz music of the past. This program exposes students to historical information and countless contributions of various jazz artists to show the correlation between jazz and hip-hop music.

Lecture: “Post-racial America and African American Literature”

Jacqueline Blackwell,  Associate Professor of English, TNCC

February 26
11:00 a.m.
Room 222, Historic Triangle Campus

This thought-provoking lecture is free and open to the public.



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