Nursing Program Graduation & Employment Rates | Thomas Nelson Community College

Nursing Program Graduation & Employment Rates

Nursing AAS Program and LPN-to-RN Articulation Program Graduation Rates Within 100% and 150% of Time Thomas Nelson Community College

Nursing AAS 100% and 150% Graduation Rates, Hampton Cohort

Entering Semester Number of Students Graduated in 100% of Time Graduated in 150% of Time
N % N %
Fall 2011 58 38 65.5% 44 75.9%
Fall 2012 50 41 82.0% 42 84.0%
Fall 2013 57 45 78.9% 48 84.2%
Fall 2014 48 33 68.8% 39 81.3%
Fall 2015 51 28 54.9% -- --

Nursing AAS 100% and 150% Graduation Rates, Historic Triangle Cohort

Entering Semester Number of Students Graduated in 100% of Time Graduated in 150% of Time
N % N %
Spring 2011 29 22 75.9% 23 79.3%
Spring 2012 29 22 75.9% 26 89.7%
Spring 2013 30 22 73.3% 24 80.0%
Spring 2014 27 19 70.4% 23 85.2%
Spring 2015 30 18 60.0% 23 76.7%
Spring 2016 28 25 89.3% -- --

Nursing AAS/LPN-to-RN Articulation Program 100% and 150% Graduation Rates, Hampton Cohort

Entering Semester Number of Students Graduated in 100% of Time Graduated in 150% of Time
N % N %
Spring 2011 14 10 71.4% 10 71.4%
Spring 2012 15 10 66.7% 11 73.3%
Spring 2013 12 9 75.0% 11 91.7%
Spring 2014 -- -- -- -- --
Spring 2015 7 7 100.0% 7 100.0%
Spring 2016 11 7 63.6% -- --
  1. Graduation within 100% and 150% of time is defined as follows:
    • For the Hampton cohorts in the Nursing AAS program starting Fall Semester with NUR 104, 100% of time graduation is graduation by the end of the second academic year. For example, for the Fall 2012 entering cohort, 100% of time graduation would be graduation by May 2014; graduation in 150% of time would be graduation by May 2015.
    • For the Historic Triangle cohorts in the Nursing AAS program starting Spring Semester with NUR 104, 100% of time graduation is graduation by December of the third academic year of enrollment. For example, for the Spring 2012 entering cohort, 100% of time graduation would be graduation by December 2013; graduation in 150% of time would be graduation by December 2014.
    • For the Nursing AAS/LPN to RN Articulation Program cohorts starting in NUR 115 in Spring Semester at Hampton, completion in 100% of time is graduation by May of the following academic year. For example, for the entering Spring 2012 cohort, 100% of time graduation would be graduation by May 2013; graduation in 150% of time would be graduation by December 2013.
  2. Students in each entering cohort are limited to those who took the first‐semester nursing course (NUR 104 for the AAS, NUR 115 for the AAS/LPN‐to‐RN) for the first time. First time enrollment was verified by checking that the student was not enrolled in that course in either of the previous two years. For example, the students counted as part of the Fall 2012 AAS entering cohort who took NUR 104 in Fall 2012 were not enrolled in NUR 104 in between Fall 2010 and Spring 2012.
  3. No students were enrolled in NUR 115 in Spring 2014. 

Data source: VCCS CRT Class Files, PeopleSoft SIS Query (June 2016).

Employment of Nursing Graduates

Academic Years 2011‐2012 through 2013‐2014

This report provides data on employment rates among graduates of the A.A.S. in Nursing program at Thomas Nelson Community College. The following table shows the number of graduates per term, the number and percent that were employed during the six to twelve month period following their graduation, and the number and percent that were employed in the health care industry. 

Nursing A.A.S. Graduates by Term and Employment Status

Completion Term Number of Graduates Number Employed Percent Employed Number Employed in Health Percent Employed in Health
Fall 2011 26 16 61.5% 14 53.8%
Spring 2012 50 43 86.0% 41 82.0%
2011-2012 Total 76 59 77.6% 55 72.4%
Fall 2012 24 21 87.5% 21 87.5%
Spring 2013 49 41 83.7% 38 77.6%
2012-2013 73 62 84.9% 59 80.8%
Summer & Fall 2013 26 17 65.4% 17 65.4%
Spring 2014 57 43 75.4% 41 71.9%
2013-2014 Total 83 60 72.3% 58 69.9%
  1. 'Number employed' indicates the number of graduates who were employed within the six to twelve month period following their term of graduation. For Spring graduates, employment during this time period was indicated by a record from Quarters 1 or 2 of the year after their graduation (e.g., Quarters 1 or 2 of 2012 for a Spring 2011 graduate). For Fall graduates, employment during this time period was indicated by a record from Quarters 3 or 4 of the year after their graduation (e.g., Quarters 3 or 4 of 2013 for a Fall 2012 graduate). For the Summer graduate, employment during Quarters 2 and 3 of the following year indicated employment.
  2. Prior to 2013, employment was determined by records in the Virginia Employment Commission (VEC) Unemployment Insurance database. Data on individuals employed in Maryland, New Jersey, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia are also included in that data set. For 2013 and later, employment was determined by records in the Wage Record Interchange System (WRIS2). WRIS2 captures employment in a broader range of locations (39 states as of February 2016). Due to the difference in scope, caution is urged in comparing employment across years. For all years, military or federal employees, or employees whose employers do not pay unemployment insurance, are not captured.
  3. A graduate was considered employed in the health care industry if his/her employer's North American Industry Classification (NAICS) code began with '621', '622', or '623'. These codes include the following: offices of physicians, mental health specialists, dentists, chiropractors, optometrists, physical/occupational/speech therapists, podiatrists, or other health practitioners; family planning centers, outpatient mental health and substance abuse centers, HMO medical centers, kidney dialysis centers, surgical and emergency centers, or other outpatient care centers; medical laboratories, diagnostic imaging centers, home health care services, ambulance services, blood and organ banks, or other ambulatory health care services; general medical and surgical hospitals, psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals, specialty hospitals, nursing care facilities, residential mental retardation facilities, residential mental health and substance abuse facilities, retirement communities, homes for the elderly, or other residential care facilities.

Data source: PeopleSoft SIS Query (June 2016), VCCS Graduate Files, Virginia Employment Commission Unemployment Insurance Files