TimelyCare Helps Students | Thomas Nelson Community College

TimelyCare Helps Students

In a move to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 amid a surging new variant, Thomas Nelson (becoming Virginia Peninsula Community College) is switching most of its classes from in-person to virtual for the first two weeks of spring semester. Read more.

January 6, 2022

With the mental well-being of students becoming more and more important, Thomas Nelson is taking another step to show support. TimelyCare, a new telehealth program for students, is now available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“If you just look at the national statistics, anywhere from 25 to 30 percent of students have a formal diagnosis of a mental health disorder,” said Richard Hurst, the coordinator of Disability Support Services and a counselor at the College.

TimelyCare provides this round-the-clock access at no cost to students. The service comes as part of continuing VCCS efforts to prioritize the health and well-being of its campus communities.

“They realize how many students are struggling right now,” Hurst said. “The whole world is, but they wanted to do what they could to help our students and give them this extra resource.”

Three services are available:

  • TalkNow: 24/7, on-demand access to a mental health professional to talk about anything at any time;
  • Scheduled counseling: Options to speak to a licensed counselor;
  • Group sessions: Weekly guided meditation and yoga group sessions, plus specialized discussions throughout the year.

There is an online application process for TimelyCare, which can be accessed at  timelycare.com/vccs, but it takes no more than 10 minutes, said Hurst. The application helps the counselors at the website identify the issues and provides background information.

“Across the country, the No.1 issue with many people … is our relationships.” Hurst said. “Anxiety and depression are up there too, but relationships have been one of the biggest factors.”

Students can access the link as often as needed, and but the scheduled sessions are limited to six. However, students can request specific counselors.

“They'll break it down for them so that they can choose who they're most comfortable speaking to,” Hurst said, adding all are qualified professionals.

With telehealth become a much more important aspect of health care, some estimates show 20-30 percent of doctor visits in the future will come via this method, it’s important for the College to provide this service.

Hurst’s hope is for people who are struggling will take advantage of this opportunity to talk to someone who can help them sort out their feelings and provide advice.

“Anytime someone needs to speak to someone, they can,” he said.

Learn more at timely.md.